Design Tunnel

Education, Podcast

I’m so excited to announce that we are now recording at Design Tunnel studio in downtown OKC. Design Tunnel is a marketing and video production company. You can check out their website or connect with them on Twitter @DesignTunnel_OK and FacebookDT logo

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First interview at Design Tunnel with Alberto Jiménez Hidalgo. Talking about technology in the Early Childhood Classroom.

Episode 008: Interview with April Mickelson

Education, Education Podcast, Instructional

449px-BalancedLiteracy

April Mickelson is a remedial specialist at Jackson Enterprise in Oklahoma City Public Schools. She started out as a kindergarten teacher (which is my favorite grade too) and now as a remedial specialist she serves her school as a reading interventions, lead professional development facilitator and a literacy coach.

The Balanced Literacy approach has 8 components: read aloud, guided reading, shared reading, interactive writing, shared writing, Reading Workshop, Writing Workshop and Word study. Balanced Literacy combines the ideas behind whole language and phonics programs. This approach to literacy allows the ELA teacher to look at the big picture of teaching reading and language arts.

Below are the questions I prepared to ask April (there were some follow up questions in the podcast that are not included below):

  1. Share about your education background/experience.
  2. What is the Balanced Literacy approach?
  3. What are the main components of Balanced Literacy?
  4. Why is the Balanced Literacy approach superior to other literacy programs?
  5. Describe a Balanced Literacy lesson.
  6. What would the lesson plan need to have in it? i.e., what would need to be different about lesson planning for a Balanced Literacy approach has opposed to other lesson plans?
  7. What are mini-lessons? What should be included in a mini-lesson?
  8. When you enter into a classroom, what do you look for in a classroom using a Balanced Literacy approach?
  9. What are the practical steps for teachers who need to being implementing a Balanced Literacy approach?
  10. What advice would you give teachers who are on the fence about implementing a Balanced Literacy approach?
  11. What are your go to resources for Balanced Literacy?

Episode 007: Interview with Brandi Sickler

Education, Education Podcast

Brandi Sickler is one of my favorite people. I could have interviewed her about anything! She is a kindergarten teacher at Tulakes Elementary in Putnam City Schools. Brandi has taught in early childhood classrooms for 11 years, has her masters in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), and runs a blog called Teach.Empower.Kinder. You can find her on Twitter @brandi_sickler and on Facebook.

For this interview we focused on Brandi’s passion for Flexible Seating (linked is her blog post that includes pictures of her classroom). Flexible Seating has recently taken off in classrooms from PK to twelfth grade. I love the idea of having a relaxing and open classroom. In this episode, Brandi talks me through how she finally took the plunge and gives her practical advice to teachers considering a change in their classroom set-up.

Below are the questions I prepared to ask Brandi (there were some follow up questions in the podcast that are not included below):

  1. Tell us about your teaching history/ educational experience.
  2. What gave you the idea to start flexible seating in your classroom?
  3. How did you get started?
  4. What types of flexible seating do you provide in your classroom?
  5. What materials and supplies do you provide to your students that support flexible seating?
  6. How have your parents responded to flexible seating in your classroom? Students?
  7. Have you noticed changes in student engagement? Achievement?
  8. What advice would you give other teachers interested in making the change to flexible seating?

Episode 004: Interview with Jamie Gibbons

Education, Education Podcast, Policy

The Teacher Walkout! April 2, 2018 has come and gone and educators across the state of Oklahoma are in Day 5 of the teacher walkout. So much has happened and while I wasn’t planning on releasing an episode of Passing Notes this week, I felt like I needed to. So, I sat down and interviewed Jamie Gibbons, an OKCPS teacher about her reflections on what has happened and the work that still needs to be done.

Share your thoughts and reflections from this week in the comments section.

Episode 003: Interview with Claudia Swisher, Part B

Education, Education Podcast, Policy

Interview with Claudia Swisher continued.

Episode 002: Interview with Claudia Swisher, Part A

Education, Education Podcast, Policy

I have followed Claudia Swisher on Twitter @ClaudiaSwisher and on her blog Fourth Generation Teacher for years. She has truly been an advocate for education throughout her 39-year teaching career and now into retirement. Over the years I have learned from Claudia the importance of advocacy and persistence in the face of seeming defeat.  Claudia has taught students at every grade-level in the K-12 system as an elementary classroom teacher, a school media specialist, a multi-categorical resource special education teacher, a title 1 remedial reading teacher, and a high school English teacher. She is certified in English Language Arts, library media, and reading specialist with a graduate degree and 20 hours past a masters in special education. Oh and she is a National Board Certified Teacher.

However, this quote by Marjory Stoneman Douglas, which she proudly displays on both her Facebook and Twitter pages, sums her up and her life mission: “Be a nuisance where it counts; do you part to inform and stimulate the public to join your action. Be depressed, discouraged, and disappointed at failure and the disheartening effects of ignorance, greed, corruption and bad politics – but never give up!”

The Teacher Walkout in the state of Oklahoma has been a true grassroots movement, spring boarded by the 9-day teacher walkout in West Virginia, where teacher pay was ranked at 47th. Oklahoma teachers banned together through the use of social media to plan, strategize, and get union leaders on board. The potential walkout in Oklahoma is remarkable, as it is not been pulled together by teachers rallying around a bill, was not union started, and is coming on the heels of two failed special sessions that failed to fund core services in our state. Further, this upcoming walkout is inclusive and is calling for state employees to join the cause. It is not just about teachers but our legislators failure to increase revenue and fund the government. The OEA has demanded that the legislator fund a teacher and support staff pay raise, increase funds to education, and fund a raise for state employees.

It is truly amazing what a group of dedicated, civically involved individuals can do to better our society. Further our students and children are watching. We are modeling for them democracy in action.

The Best Prize

Education

I graduated from the University of Oklahoma in December of 2017 and had the unique privilege of being the convocation speaker. I took the opportunity to share with current and future educators the importance of our profession and the challenges our state is currently facing. Below is my speech, I wanted to share it here. You can also listen to it here on YouTube starting at 16:55.

Convocation Speech

Faculty, family and friends, the Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education, graduates of 2017.

I am truly honored to be standing before you today, not only as a representative of this incredible college but also as a representative of this incredible profession.

For many of you the completion of this degree means the beginning of your career and I am thrilled to be welcoming you to the profession. As I, myself, have entered into my tenth year as an Oklahoma educator, I can tell you that this is the most rewarding and challenging work. I commend you for choosing such a noble profession and I challenge you to be a tireless advocate for education, to build lifetime relationships with your future students and their families, and to give the community you serve your best every day.

For some of you the completion of this degree means that you are entering into a new chapter of your professional career. You have learned and experienced more through the attainment of this new degree: share more, mentor a new teacher, pour into the younger generation of educators who will later be the leaders of our profession, they need you and all that you have to offer with your knowledge and experience.

Graduates, as we leave the University of Oklahoma and find our place in the world and in education, we should reflect on the lessons we have learned here and how they have and will continue to shape us as educators:

First, there is no greater gift than education. It furthers our society, takes us to new horizons, and grows our communities. As educators we become a part of that movement. Unfortunately, we are in a time where the trend is towards blaming educators in attempts to dictate a dialogue that our schools are no longer succeeding. However, I would argue against this discourse. Every year educators achieve more with less, we love the communities we serve, and give to our students and their families of ourselves, both financially and emotionally. We educate all students. We educate all students; meeting them where their needs are and growing them to their full potential in less than one year. Further, educators understand that our students are more than a performance on a test and that the value of a quality education cannot be measured on a single day of a school year. We implement legislation that doesn’t always make sense and we consistently persist in the face of the harsh realities that is our current atmosphere. Great educators are creative and our ingenuity is building the citizens of tomorrow in today’s classrooms.

Second, no one achieves in isolation. Each of us, just by being here today, represents a community that has poured into us. For me, this list includes a supportive spouse, loving parents, friends, and family members. Educators know the value of having a community that supports their professional growth. As an educator, I have been fortunate to have a number of mentors who have taught me what it means to invest in others, fellow teachers who encouraged and supported me when teaching was hard because teaching is hard; a principal who has encouraged me to take risks and has pushed and supported me through new endeavors; and an advisor who has taught me the importance of thinking critically and helped me to find my voice as an advocate. Educators, do not work alone, this profession is not for the faint of heart and we need one another for our own success and most importantly for our students’ success. Further, we must always remember how others have supported us to where we are today and be forever grateful of the ways in which they have empowered us to be leaders in our field.

Lastly and most importantly, we must remember why we chose education. Education is a calling. I have always believed that. For me it was a calling when I met my first class of students; it has been a calling with every relationship I have built with my students and their families; it was a calling the first time I realized I had students living with food insecurity; it has been a calling every time I have taught a student to read or understand a difficult math concept; it was a calling when I watched a student pass away after years of battling brain cancer and it was a calling when I explained to his classmates and their families why he would no longer be attending our class; it was a calling when I chose to attend countless sporting events, birthday parties, and cultural celebrations of my students to build relationships and community with the families I served; and it was a calling when I became a kinship foster parent to a student who would later call my house his own home. We may not fully understand the extent of our calling when it chose us but nonetheless it calls us. Great educators are compelled to do great things for their students because we are called.

I will leave you with this, President Theodore Roosevelt once said: “Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing” – I can think of no greater work worth doing than education and I can think of no better people to do this work with.

Congratulations Class of 2017 and Live on University!